Sugar and Spice Cookies

June 29, 2007 by · 19 Comments 

A great sweet snack in Buenos Aires

Sugar and Spice and everything nice

Sugar and Spice makes some fantastically delicious cookies and cakes. In a cafe-happy city like Buenos Aires, coffee and pastries may begin to become monotonous, but not at Sugar and Spice. This Palermo shop has left the coffee behind and instead focused on perfecting their pastries to be some of the finest quality in the city.

It may be difficult to sample them all, but those the ones you will try are extremely tasty, and a perfect accompaniment to a cup of tea or coffee. Don’t miss their “passion for chocolate” cookies and “super chocolate” budin (cake), if you are a chocolate lover. Also a good pick are the raisin and oatmeal cookies and, from their savory range of biscuits, the copetin fugazza (a biscuit flavored like fugazza, an Italian/Argentine pizza with no cheese or sauce – just the dough with onions, olive oil and oregano). Great stuff!

Buenos Aires bloggers meet at Sugar and Spice HQ

Cookies and the Buenos Aires blog scene

Sugar and Spice has graciously hosted a Buenos Aires bloggers at the event, and as is the trend, most of them have already written about it: Nathan, Diva, Dalila and Marce, for starters. Check their posts for more descriptions of these delectable treats.

 

If you are in Buenos Aires and want to be part of the cookie inner circle, you can find these delicious treats all over the city. Sugar and Spice biscuits and cookies are available in the following fine Buenos Aires establishments (among others):

Shops

  • Sugar and Spice, Guatemala 5415, Palermo Hollywood
  • Falabella (two outlets along Florida shopping street in the city center)
  • Al queso, queso (outlets all over the city)

Cafes and Ice Cream Parlors (each with outlets all over the city)

  • Aroma cafe
  • McDonald’s McCafe
  • The Coffee Store
  • Freddo
  • Munchis

Direct Orders: Sugar and Spice Contact details

Location of Sugar and Spice

Guatemala 5415, corner Av. Juan B Justo, Palermo Hollywood

Tel: 4777 5423,  Website: http://www.sugarandspice.com.ar

Buenos Aires Vegetarian and Vegan Food

June 27, 2007 by · 14 Comments 

Chicken is a vegetable, right?

The real reason why Argentine chickens cross the road
[Original photo credit: lonecellotheory]

In Buenos Aires, the land of steak, it’s gotta be hard for vegetarians and vegans. After all this is a place where people asking for meat-free options in restaurants will surely hear the waiter offer up dishes with ham or chicken in them, because, after all, they don’t include any carne (beef).

Most people here in Buenos Aires simply cannot comprehend a life without beef, and who could really blame them for this standpoint, when 1. meat is so good in Argentina, and 2. eating beef is so ingrained into daily porteño life. However, if you come to Buenos Aires as a vegetarian or vegan, there are still quite a few dining options available…

Argentina’s vegetarian & vegan food options

Some of the most successful vegan dining experiences in Buenos Aires can be had at Filo in Retiro (more or less the city center), where a delicious cheese-less pizza is an excellent choice, and at Bio in Palermo Viejo, where both seitan vegetable curry with coconut milk, and tofu in a Dijon mustard sauce grace the menu.

And there are of course, many other options for vegetarians in Buenos Aires, many of which are also applicable to vegans, or can be easily changed to be so by making a special request…

Vegetarian and vegan restaurants & food in Buenos Aires

  • Buenos Aires has a strong Italian immigrant heritage, and so pasta dishes are an excellent choice for the vegetarian (and many are suitable for vegans too) – you will find acceptable al dente pasta dishes in many Argentine restaurants.
  • Along the same lines, Pizza is an excellent choice here for vegetarians – some of the best available at Guerrin in the city center, Morelia in Palermo Hollywood and Banchero in La Boca. For vegans, cheese-less pizzas will be available at most pizzerias, in the form of fuggazza, a type of pizza made from just pizza dough, olive oil, oregano, and onions. But vegans should beware its close relation, the fugazetta, which also has cheese. In addition faina, a fried chickpea dough, is an excellent vegetarian accompaniment to pizza (eaten on top of your slice).
  • Despite sometimes having a lack of variety, salads are also a good option for vegetarians and vegans in Buenos Aires, and can be found in the majority of restaurants. OK, so many set salads include either eggs, ham or cheese, but in most places you will be able to armar (make/design) your own salad, from a number of choices, such as tomato, lettuce, onion, potato, green beans, carrot, avocado, palm hearts, and so on.
  • Dan from Saltshaker has a number of good suggestions for vegetarian and vegan food in Buenos Aires. On this page of his you will find his complete list of vegetarian resources and restaurant recommendations. For an interesting vegetarian option from his reviewed list, try Siempre Verde in Belgrano (for Chinese vegetarian food – which is also a good vegetarian option in many other Chinese restaurants and tenedor libres – all you can eat joints), or for a vegan restaurant suggestion, try Krishna Love in Palermo Viejo (scroll down on that page for the review).
  • For those veggie-lovers traveling with meat-eating companions, a nice compromise is Artemisia in Palermo Viejo, a serene and natural environment that boasts a fresh vegetarian menu of salads, woks and seasonal dishes – with a few fish options for those interested.
  • Another interesting, potentially spicy possibility for vegetarians in Buenos Aires is the California Burrito Company, in the city center, who offer up tasty vegetarian burritos and salads, which can also be suitable for vegans you pick and choose the ingredients appropriately – which is dead easy, because your burrito or salad is made at the counter right in front of your very eyes.

So there is some “food for thought” before you dine out as a vegan or vegetarian in Buenos Aires.

Read more about Vegan dining in an excellent post by the urban vegan, who came to Buenos Aires to hunt down some excellent vegan food options in Buenos Aires restaurants. She has also posted on Buenos Aires in general, including many fantastic photos of the city (and Colonia del Sacramento too). Go check it out!

Mataderos Fair

June 26, 2007 by · 11 Comments 

All the fun of the gaucho fair

Feria de Mataderos, Buenos Aires

One of the best-kept secrets in Buenos Aires is the Feria de Mataderos, a weekly event that takes place during the fall, winter and spring months (approximately March to December) on Sundays, from about 11am and into the early evening (during January to the start of March a cut-down version of the Mataderos fair is held on Saturdays nights, from 6pm). You may already know about the ferias (street fairs) in San Telmo or Recoleta, but if you want a real South American experience, come to Mataderos to see the gauchos (Argentine cowboys) and friends, who come from the countryside with their displays of horsemanship, handicrafts, live music, folk dancing, and delicious foods.

The Feria de Mataderos

The fair has an upbeat and jovial atmosphere, despite taking place in one of the poorest sectors of the capital. Mataderos, and its neighboring neighborhood of Liniers, were where cattle were traditionally brought in from around the country, slaughtered, and then shipped out as meat to other parts of the capital (in Spanish, Mataderos literally means slaughterhousesand the area is also often called Nueva Chicago, because of the cattle-killing heritage it shares with the ‘Windy City’).

For this reason there is an interesting mix of cultures: gauchos, porteños, and migrant workers from Bolivia & Paraguay. The fair represents this colorful combination of traditions, dancing and artwork.

Dancers from the La Rioja province of Argentina, at the Mataderos fair

To get to the fair from other parts of Buenos Aires is about a 45-minute-plus bus ride on one of the following colectivos (city buses): 55, 63, 80, 92, 117, 126, 141, 155, and 180. Of these, the 55 and the 92 are the ones that bring you closest; with the others you may have to walk a little bit. Just ask the bus driver to let you off at the fair (if you are following your map, with the 55 and 92 buses, the exact intersection you need to get off at is Av. Directorio and Av. Lisandro de la Torre).

Mataderos can sometimes be a bit of a rough neighborhood, so be sensible and keep an eye on your belongings – leave the Rolexes, pearl earrings, and mega-expensive cameras at home. Of course it’s fine to bring a camera and some money, but always be aware of where they are on you, and don’t flash either around carelessly (this is of course also good advice for all tourists visiting any city in the world) – especially as the fair is usually very crowded.

The crowds enjoying the Feria de Mataderos

Traditional Argentine Folk Music & Dancing

At the Mataderos fair, you can spend a few hours taking in the gaucho culture by watching the locals do folk dances known as zambas, accompanied by live musicians on a nearby outdoor stage. The zamba (not to be confused with the extremely different Brazilian samba) is a pleasure to watch. It is danced in pairs, a staged routine of flirtation in which the man and the woman dance toward each other and then quickly whirl away, waving scarves or handkerchiefs in flirtatious gestures. The dancers wear traditional Argentine costumes from the countryside, often in bright colors. My favorite part is when the men break into rhythmic step dances, which is akin to tap dancing with gaucho boots: very impressive!

With the live band playing folk music on accordions, traditional bombo legüero drums, folk guitars, and vocals, it’s a true fiesta, a street party, and people might grab you by the shoulder and laughingly try to pull you into their dancing circle. Feel free to join in!

Folkloric dancing at the Feria de Mataderos

Picking out a bargain at the fair

There are plenty of beautiful handicrafts at the fair, and in fact you might find some of the best deals in Buenos Aires here. Specialties of the Mataderos fair are leather goods, mate gourds, stone and silver jewelry, trinkets and good-luck charms molded from clay or other natural materials, key chains, wind chimes, and other fun objects that make great souvenirs or gifts. Usually the price the seller gives you is what you are expected to pay, although if your Spanish is good and you are accustomed to bargaining, you can try to get a deal for buying more than one thing. For example, if you buy five necklaces, the seller may give you five or ten percent off the price.

Market stall at the mataderos fair

If you are on the lookout for a souvenir that is purely Argentine, keep your eyes open for something known as a duendito. These are little clay figures that look like miniature garden gnomes, and you can always find them in any Argentine craft fair. The figure is supposed to radiate the spirit of the mountains and nature, and it is often wearing a big floppy hat and something like elf shoes. Some artisans make them with plaques where your name or a message like “Luck of the duendito” can be engraved to personalize your gift.

Got the Mataderos munchies?

As you walk around the Feria de Mataderos, which covers four long blocks in the streets, you may want to grab a choripan or a pancho. These staples of Argentine street cuisine are grilled sausage sandwiches and hot-dogs, respectively. The greasy treats are obscenely cheap and also not the healthiest choices, but there’s nothing quite like munching on a choripan while sitting on a bench people-watching on a Sunday afternoon.

Cooking up some delicious chorizo sausages on an Argentine grill
[Photo credit: Paul Keller]

If outdoor food, or greasy sausages for that matter, aren’t your style, then take a look at this Argentina Travel Guide blog, which has a review of an interesting place to eat in Mataderos – that is, if you like the choices on offer of empanadas, empanadas, or… empanadas! However, if you like variety and trying something new, there are many other cheap restaurants and stalls, most with outside seating, lining the fair, offering up delicious Argentine regional treats such as locro, asado, tamales, and torta frita.

See some remarkable gaucho horse riding skills

For many people, the most interesting event at the Feria de Mataderos is the Carerra de Sortija – the “Race of the Ring”. This usually starts at about 3.30pm along a stretch of the road Av. Lisandro de la Torre, and it is where gauchos race their horses at breakneck speeds towards a small ring hung onto a raised metal frame overhead. The gauchos stand up in their stirrups as they race, and try to spear the ring, which is no larger than a normal piece of jewelry, with a small pointy stick. Everytime a gaucho is successful in spearing the ring, the crowds go wild, and the gaucho is extremely happy to milk the applause for all it’s worth as he trots back on their horse through the crowd holding the ring above his head.

Mataderos Fair Information & Guides

If it rains, the Mataderos usually still goes ahead. However, on holidays, such as election days, the fair is not held. You can find up to date information at the official Feria de Mataderos website (Spanish). You can also call to ask questions: 4687-5602 (on Sundays) or 4374-9664 (Monday through Friday), but of course your Spanish will need to be pretty decent for that.

So grab your camera, friends, hostel-mates, significant others, children, or parents, and head out to the Feria de Mataderos to experience provincial Argentine culture and relaxation; this is an activity for everyone, of any age and personality. Enjoy the colorful music and dance, try some of the foods, take some great photos, marvel at the gaucho horsemanship, and don’t forget to get a souvenir to take home as a memory.

[Article by Rachel Singer]

Location of Feria de Mataderos

Av. Lisandro de la Torre & Av. de los Corrales, Mataderos

Cochabamba 444 Tango Milonga

June 22, 2007 by · 7 Comments 

An authentic milonga in San Telmo

Red Hot (Leggings) on the Tango Milonga Dance Floor

*If you want to check out some authentic tango salons in Buenos Aires, the easiest and most fun way to do so is on a private tango nightlife tour, where your personal guide will show you the local scene and explain everything that is going on to you, taking you to the best places on the night of your choice. For more information, click here.*

For an authentic tango experience in Buenos Aires, there are many options beyond the professional Argentine Tango Shows. For a different side of Tango, head to Cochabamba 444, the San Telmo milonga where the city’s best tango dancers come to strut across the dance floor with people of all ages, walks of life, and nationalities. The bar is dimly lit by chandeliers with yellow bulbs, giving an aura of antiquity that takes you back to Buenos Aires in its Golden Age of high-society and sizzling tango bars. It’s located on a quiet street just three blocks from Plaza Dorrego, where the Sunday antiques fair is held.

Tango dancers at the Cochabamba 444 milonga in San Telmo

Buenos Aires tango lessons

If you’d like to try out your dancing shoes, tango lessons are offered Thursday and Friday nights at 8pm at Cochabamba 444 (arrive a little late and there’ll be no problem – this is Argentina, after all). The teacher gives the class in Spanish, but if your Spanish isn’t great have no fear, because there is bound to be some English-speaking expat or even an Argentine who will happily translate for you as you whirl around the floor (or trip over your own feet, as the case may be). There may be better places in Buenos Aires for instruction on dancing tango than Cochabamba 444, but this milonga is really known for is its atmosphere and music.

Dance the night away, or just watch and enjoy

If you just want to come to watch the dancers and enjoy the music, you can show up around 10pm or 10:30pm and grab a table near the modest bar in the back. The bar serves bottles of cheap wine and things to munch on like empanadas, and picadas (plates of meats, cheese, olives etc), all at very low prices, even by Buenos Aires standards. Overall, the bar is populated by Argentines who are serious about tango, but there are certainly some foreigners on the scene too.

Once the music starts, even the most unassuming of patrons will whisk out on the dance floor and dazzle you with their grace, covert sensuality, and intensity. There’s a method to the madness, though: the culture of tango is outlined in strict rules that you can only learn from being a part of it. For example, the men always ask the women for a dance, and sometimes it’s done subtly with just a raised eyebrow. And once a couple is dancing tango, they will continue as partners for an entire song set.

A traditional Tango band belts out some classic tunes

Cochabamba 444: a performance worth coming for

Toward the end of the night, Cochabamba 444 will typically offer some sort of performance. It’s usually a traditional live tango band, who will bang out classic tunes with style on a stand-up bass, bandoneon (the type of accordion used in tango), and piano. Sometimes, however, you might get lucky and see a hilarious puppet show or a singer belting out some soul tunes.

Make note that Thursday night is arguably the best night to go, although you will probably also see some spectacular dancing and live music on Fridays too.

Make note, dress is casual but it’s best not to wear jeans and sneakers, as tango culture is somewhat more refined and traditional. You may not easily meet other travelers or Argentines at Cochabamba, but you will certainly observe a beautiful dance, authentic tango culture, and stirring musical performances.

[Article written by Rachel Singer]

Location of Cochabamba 444

Cochabamba 444, between Defensa & Bolivar, San Telmo

Buenos Aires Videos

June 15, 2007 by · 8 Comments 

Some Cool Online Videos Shot Around Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires Videos from Geobeats

For an inside look at the city of Buenos Aires, check out these online videos for many different travel destinations around the world, all compliled on a website called Geobeats. They have an excellent video section on Buenos Aires, with many videos from around the more famous barrios of Buenos Aires, including spots on hotels, restaurants and museums. All of the videos of Buenos Aires are very professionally done and pretty informative. There is only so much of an idea you can get about Buenos Aires or Argentina from the text and photos, so before you take the plunge and come visit, use the videos as a preview.

Standout Videos of Buenos Aires from Geobeats

Start out by screening a few of the more impressive visuals in Buenos Aires:

MALBA, in Palermo

The fantastic Museo de Arte Latinamerico en Buenos Aires:

El Ateneo, in Recoleta

The biggest bookstore in Latin America:

Confiteria Las Violetas, in Almagro

A stunning cafe with top-notch pastries:

Enjoy those videos of Buenos Aires! (and check out some more over at Geobeats when you can)

Buenos Aires to London by bus?

June 14, 2007 by · 2 Comments 

That’ll be a return bus ticket from Palermo to Islington please…

Red London bus in the Palermo parks, Buenos Aires

Fear not, you didn’t miss the news about a new transatlantic bridge from Argentina to England. Let’s face it, structural considerations aside, it’ll never happen.

So, if there isn’t a running bus route from Palermo to Islington, then what’s a traditional old red double-decker London bus doing in Palermo, Buenos Aires, of all places? Read on…

No one knows!

After a quick phone call to the cellphone number posted on the side of the bus (it’s for sale), no details have been revealed. The man on the other end of the line recounts that the bus has been in Buenos Aires for many years, since before he joined the company that’s now selling it. Other than that, he didn’t know too much about it’s background). It was uncovered that during its time in Buenos Aires, the bus has mostly been used for filming adverts or movies that need to look like they are set in London, and for other assorted events.

London Bus for Sale in Buenos Aires

In fact, it will cost you a pretty peso if you wish to purchase this fine specimen of British automotive history. The bus is listed as 110,000 pesos (about US$37,000, or approximately 18,500 of the Queen’s British Pounds), and you can drive it away today. Just think of the fun you could have racing it against the crazy colectivos in Buenos Aires.

UPDATE: If there really are any interested parties out there, you’re out of luck. **The bus is no longer there, and it appears that it has been sold.**

Colonia del Sacramento Day Trip

June 12, 2007 by · 77 Comments 

Buenos Aires to Colonia del Sacramento Day Trip

Picturesque street in Colonia, Uruguay

UPDATE Below you can read our legendary article (and many comments!) about doing a day trip to Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay while you are visiting Buenos Aires. But first, we have news!

New Tour Offering: Day Trips to Colonia, Uruguay

Here at BuenosTours we have partnered with another top local tour company to offer all-inclusive Day Trips to Colonia in small-to-medium group sizes, with an expert native-English speaker guide. You’ll make the best of your day there, learn a ton of interesting stuff, and won’t have to worry about the hassle of reading this article and making all the plans yourself.

We’ll take care of it all for you, for a price of just $280 USD per person. You will not find another service like this. The full day tour (of around 12 hours, from approx. 6.30am to 6.30pm, although pick-up and drop-off times vary depending on where you are staying in Buenos Aires) includes:

– An expert guide (whose first language is English) with you from start to finish
– Small-to-medium group size (max 12 passengers- average group size is 5)
– Transport to the Buenos Aires ferry terminal
Fast ferry (approx. 1 hour) crossing to Colonia del Sacramento
– A fascinating walking tour of the historical heart of Colonia
– A mid-morning drink & snack break in Colonia’s main square
– Mate lesson and tasting (pronounced MAH-tay, it’s the green tea of South America)
Traditional Uruguayan chivito lunch (beverages included – wine, beer or soft drink)
– Free time to explore, shop, or just take in the peacefulness that is Colonia
– Optional museum/lighthouse viewing platform entry for during your free time (cost included)
– Afternoon ice cream or in winter, hot chocolate
– Fast ferry (approx. 1 hour) crossing back to Buenos Aires
– Transport from the Buenos Aires ferry terminal

*Note: if you request to book for a date less than a week in advance, there may be a surcharge of 10% added to the US$280 per person cost, to cover the increase in ferry ticket prices at that late stage. We encourage you to book as far in advance as you can, not only to save money, but to ensure availability!*

Please feel free to complete the following form if you’re interested, or have any questions – we’re looking forward to showing you life on the other side of the Rio de la Plata!:

(First name, last name, please)

OK, for those of you who prefer to do things the hard way, please read on for the article and sorry for the above distraction…

A Short Hop Across the Rio de la Plata

Colonia del Sacramento may be in a different city entirely – not to mention in a whole other country – but it is such a popular day trip for people visiting Buenos Aires, that it must be considered as an option. Situated in Uruguay, a short hop across the Rio de la Plata, Colonia is a tranquil beach town that provides an often necessary break from the chaotic city of Buenos Aires. It may sound strange that in guide books, websites, forums etc, a regular answer to the common question “what can I do in Buenos Aires, Argentina?” is “visit Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay.” However, if you are visiting Buenos Aires for a fairly long period, or are an expat living here (perhaps in need of a 3 monthly tourist visa renewal), then a trip to sleepy old Colonia del Sacramento does indeed make for a nice day trip, to get away from the craziness of the city and to remind yourself of what the horizon actually looks like.

Yes, that's right, we're going to Uruguay

How to: Buenos Aires to Colonia by Buquebus Ferry

A trip across the Rio de la Plata from Buenos Aires to Colonia del Sacramento is fairly straightforward, and for a while there has only really been one real option: Buquebus. They run quite a few ferries back and forth between Argentina and Uruguay, seven days a week. To use the website you’ll probably have to enlist the help of Google translate, unless you have decent Spanish.

With Buquebus you can choose a fast or a slow ferry to get there (with Seacat all the ferries are fast), and there are usually special offers for both types to be found on their website. There is a fast ferry (“buque rapido”) return crossing (approx. 50 minutes each way) as well as a slow ferry return crossing (approx. 3 hours each way), which is slightly less expensive.

For peace of mind, and an easy life, it is recommended that you book online with a credit card at least a week before you want to make the trip, especially if going on a weekend, when the ferries can get booked up quickly. Then you just have to turn up at the Buquebus ferry terminal (Darsena Norte, in Puerto Madero) about an hour before your journey to pick up your tickets (at the desk immediately on your right as you enter the terminal), check in, and get in the passport control line.

The small city of Colonia only really warrants a single day of exploration, so try to book an early morning crossing going, and a late afternoon/early evening crossing coming back to Buenos Aires.

It is generally best to get a taxi to and from the Darsena Norte ferry terminal in Buenos Aires, because it is not the easiest or safest place to get to for tourists – it is literally “the other side of the (train) tracks”, which are not nice to cross on foot, in addition to some dangerous roads around that area with potentially confusing crossings.

About the City of Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay

Calle de los Suspiros in Colonia

Colonia del Sacramento was the only Portuguese settlement along the Rio de la Plata when the Spanish were colonizing this area. It was founded in 1680 with the name Nova Colonia do Sacramento by Manuel de Lobo. Colonia’s founding kick-started a struggle between the Spanish and the Portuguese over control of this area.

For years Colonia was a smuggling port, evading the strict trade measures imposed in the Americas by the Spanish. Due to this situation, the city changed hands many times between the Portuguese and the Spanish. Even Brazil controlled it for a short while, until the new country of Uruguay declared independence in 1825.

An interesting thing about Colonia is that its colonial center (Barrío Historico), offers an idea of what buildings in Buenos Aires might have looked like back in colonial times, before the city was successively modernized down the years. Colonia was recently made a UNESCO heritage site, so it should remain a time capsule of the Rio de la Plata’s colonial past for many years.

A couple of interesting historical sights in Colonia de Sacramento are the Calle de los Suspiros (street of the sighs), a beautiful little cobblestone street lined with colorful houses and Colonia’s trademark yellow lamps (see photo) – and the historical city gate and walls.

Five Tips for Enjoying a Day in Colonia

1. Take the chance to relax a little…

Colonia del Sacramento is a world apart from the hustle and bustle of Buenos Aires city, instead offering you an opportunity to relax in its peaceful, idyllic, old-world environs. Take that chance while you can, because at the end of the day you’ll be back in Argentina’s big smoke, dodging the taxi drivers on the streets once more (in Uruguay most drivers actually stop when you cross the road, rather than speeding up, what a novelty)

2. Cough up for the fast ferry…

Buenos Aires Skyline viewed from the Buquebus

With such a small pesos price difference between the 3 hour buquebus ferry and the 50 minutes one, paying that little extra for the faster boat when taking a day trip to Colonia de Sacramento is well worth it. Otherwise, over 7 hours of your day will be spent either traveling in the ferry, or getting on and off it, and that sure is a large portion of the day to waste, meaning less time for relaxing in Colonia.

3. Hire some nifty transport…

Thrifty Car Rentals, Colonia

A popular Colonia pastime, hiring a scooter and whizzing around the almost deserted coastal and country roads of Uruguay for the best part of a day can be invigorating, fun, and ever so slightly dangerous – what more could you ask for on a holiday? The best place to hire scooters in Colonia, and indeed other forms of transport, from bikes to golf carts to cars, is at Thrifty car rentals, whose office you will find as you walk out of the ferry terminal in Colonia (see photo above). Prices are reasonable and blocks of time are flexible (JUST REMEMBER: you will need your driving license and a credit card). Hiring transport will also give you easier access to parts of Colonia that you otherwise might not get to see, like the more secluded beaches pictured below.

4. Go to the beach…

Playa Ferrando, Colonia

Now you have that scooter (or golf cart for group travel!), you’ll be wondering where to go. Head out to Playa Ferrando, a very scenic beach in a small bay about 15 minutes scooter ride out from the city center. Make sure you get a map from Thrifty Rentals when you go, as the way to Playa Ferrando is marked clearly on there, in addition to other places to visit in and around Colonia. It’s the perfect place to lie down and take in a little sun, if there in summer (and even spring or fall), or go for a nice walk if visiting during winter. And yes, if you fancy a paddle, the water is safe to enter on this side of the Rio de la Plata – that murky tinge to the water is just sediment from the bottom of the riverbed.

5. Eat some cheap and cheerful junk food…

Burgers in Colonia

If the beach-front restaurants don’t tempt you, there is a great little hole in the wall place along Colonia’s main avenue (Av. General Flores), a couple of blocks or so away from the old city center, that does simply amazing hamburgers with everything (egg, ham, cheese, pickled vegetables, and all kinds of interesting and/or spicy toppings and sauces). It’s called Los Farolitos (see the last photo below), and it certainly won’t be reading about in any of the guide books. The problem with the traditional restaurants in Colonia del Sacramento is that none of them come even close to impressing, so this small purveyor of unhealthy comfort food remains an excellent choice – so pull up one of the eight or so dodgy plastic chairs outside it on the sidewalk and dig in.

More Pictures of Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay

And finally, here are a few more sufficiently random photos from trips to Colonia del Sacramento, Uruguay.

Colonia Cow Action Paddling in the shallows on Playa Ferrando

Scooter fun in Colonia del Sacramento Los Farolitos Burger Stall in Colonia

Hope you enjoyed this post and have a great time on your day trip to Colonia!

La Cabrera Restaurant

June 5, 2007 by · 22 Comments 

Buenos Aires steak at its finest

Goat's Cheese Provolone at La Cabrera Bife de Lomo al Tomillo Steak at La Cabrera

Ojo de Bife Napolitano Steak at La Cabrera Sorbeto de Limon con Champagne at La Cabrera

When it comes to recounting an experience at La Cabrera, words just can’t describe the ecstasy of enjoying one of their huge steaks or many other specialties. Take in the pictures or simply head over now to taste some of the finest steak in Buenos Aires, a city famous for its flavorsome beef.

Bife de Chorizo at La Cabrera

[Image credit: aprillynn77 at Flickr]

La Cabrera  – Beef is the word

As you can see from the two nicely sized cuts of bife de chorizo (sirloin strip steak) shown directly above, La Cabrera is extremely generous with the size of their steaks. Yet it is not only the meat which arrives in large quantities here – every main course order is accompanied with their trademark array of many small, varied side dishes, as can also be viewed in the photo above and another photo further down this post. These side dishes range from complimentary sauces (depending on what you have ordered), to couscous, mashed potato with mustard, tomatoes in sauce, calabaza (squash) puree, sweet pickled garlic, sun-dried tomatoes, guacamole, and so on, and on, and on

Steak, carne, meat and more at La Cabrera, Buenos Aires

In fact, the choices presented to you on the table at this parrilla (steakhouse) can be almost paralyzing. There is so much to look at, so many different flavors and options to go for, it may become overwhelming. If this happens, a word of advice: focus on the steak.

The Ojo de Bife Napolitano (rib eye steak with plenty of ham, cheese and sun-dried tomatoes on top) pictured above, is a fine specimen. It would be way more than enough for one person, forgetting the side dishes. So just try a few of the flavors on offer from those cute little sideshows whenever this occurs to you, but don’t let that detract from the main event, which is always going to be the huge steak.

The flavor of the beef at La Cabrera is delicious, succulent, perfectly cooked (if you ask for a punto – medium – you really do get it medium and not overcooked) and very, very juicy. And all this seems to be true whatever steak you order there, be it bife de chorizo, ojo de bife or bife de lomo – the three most popular cuts to order at La Cabrera.

La Cabrera – A House of Gluttony

And yet, despite the steak alone being more than enough to fill you up before you even think about the variety of side dishes, sometimes you have to go even further into the dark realms of over-eating and La Cabrera will probably tempt you to do so. Starters are completely unnecessary, but absolutely delicious. If you must, try the chorizo sausage (pictured below) or the goat’s cheese provolone (a type of cheese grilled on the Argentine parrilla) with sun-dried tomatoes.

Chorizo sausage at La Cabrera

If you are having starters, then a main course each would be WAY too much at La Cabrera. In fact, if you are just eating the main course and nothing else, two dishes between three people should probably fill you all to satisfaction. And if you are a couple, one main course between two will probably do, although a side of their fantastic wedge fries would do the steak justice.

Finish off the meal with a fantastic Sorbeto de Limon con Champagne (lemon sorbet with champagne). At this stage of the over-eating proceedings, having a dessert that you can drink through a straw is a very sensible idea (this dessert is also pictured in the group of pictures at the top of the post).

La Cabrera Restaurant - Great Steak House / Parrilla in Palermo Viejo, Buenos Aires

Final words of advice? Stay well away from this place if you are on a diet.

If you’re hungry for more, check out delicious steak photos from La Cabrera that were posted/linked to by Asado Argentina (scroll down on that page for the links).

Location of La Cabrera

J.A. Cabrera 5099, corner of Thames, Palermo Soho
[Other Branches: La Cabrera Norte, down a block at J.A. Cabrera 5127, Palermo Soho
La Cabrera Boutique, down the street at J.A. Cabrera 5065, Palermo Soho 
]

Tel: 4831-7002,  Website: http://www.lacabrera.com.ar

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