Rumi Nightclub

June 9, 2008 by · Leave a Comment 

Nightlife under the lights

Going loco on the dancefloor at Rumi, Buenos Aires

The trademark red lights of Rumi are anything but a sign to stop. And as long as you don’t, you’re in for a good night. Rumi boasts a welcoming and sizable venue for dancing, food, lounging and drinks, and even doubles as a restaurant in the earlier hours (at around 10pm or so).

Rumi is much more of a boliche (nightclub) than a bar or restaurant, but holds on to its desire to be all three just enough. Naturally, like any boliche/bar/restaurant in Buenos Aires, the hour in which you arrive will drastically determine the night you have in store. Because Rumi is the perfect halfway point between the larger clubs like Museum & the once famed Opera Bay, and the smaller boliches (where you find your self fighting for room at the: bar, dance floor, restrooms, entrance, etc…), it’s a great way to enjoy Argentine nightlife without having to embrace the extremes. The red lights of Rumi shine from the outside beckoning patrons to enter…

Rumi’s Wednesday Night Dinner Special

If you’ve arrived early then you’ve already avoided the fuss of waiting in line and probably sauntered your way right on in. At around 10:30pm the club serves dinner. Rumi is known for its Wednesday night, when for a fixed price you can choose between a choices of entrée, drink and dessert. The menu offers rotating options, but could be something like steak and pasta, both of which are delicious, and your choice of beers, wine or coffee. Afterwards, choosing which ice cream dessert most suits your fancy won’t be an easy feat!

Taking it easy at RumiNightclub

The Early Bird Catches the Booth in Buenos Aires

The restaurant set up is calming and still, and you’ll most likely be set up with a table on the dance floor. Keep in mind you’ll hardly notice that the exact spot you’re eating at will soon transform into a sea of dancers. However, asking politely, calling ahead, or knowing the owner might get you a booth seat located away from the dance floor. This eating scenario is more reminiscent of higher end restaurants and is also a great place to be seated if you plan on staying for the music and dancing.

The booths turn into a wonderful hiatus from the energy of the dance floor and are a perfect place to rest your feet and rejuvenate your spirits. There are seemingly endless benefits to arriving early, and here are just a few: you can see who’s arriving, who’s looking good and if it’s worth hanging around for.

rumi

So, You Think You Can Dance?

If you and your amigos have made other plans and have already enjoyed dinner, a siesta and perhaps a drink or two at another bar, then you’re here to dance. Arriving around 2:30am, you’re amongst the fashionable Argentines who are here for fun and to bust some moves. At this point the tables have been cleared, the music is pumping and everyone around you is here for the same reason. All those early birds who aren’t in it for the long haul, have flown the coop.

Rumi has a lovely outside terrace where people enjoy the fresh air and the occasional cigarette. If you want in, you’ll have to wait AND pay your dues. The covers very from weeknight to weekend, coming in a tad steeper on the nights truly dedicated for the night owls. Passing under the red letters of Rumi, yet more red summons you toward the dance floor.

Propping up the bar at Rumi, Buenos Aires

One of Rumi’s greatest perks is the bar and dance floor set up. The bar runs the length of the dance floor so there are no corner bars you need to fight and huddle your way into. The DJ booth is opposite the entrance where the man in charge of the decks quickly changes up synthesized pop hits to pumping techno as he feels out the vibe of the crowd. Those relaxing, watching or simply enjoying from afar seem to melt away, making the dance floor the center of a attention. And why shouldn’t it be? The surging crowd is filled with energy and the club stays this way until the sun comes up, and your priorities switch from boogie to bed.

A Word About Nightclub Ambiance

As mentioned, the layout of Rumi does a lot for the club. The bathrooms are upstairs and separate from the club and the hallway leading to the dance floor creates a sort of ‘calm before the storm’. Here you can find couples snuggling and making out in sphere shaped chairs, between bouts of dancing.

Rumi isn’t unaware of its red-light stereotype and hired entertainment is much more “red-light district” than the rest of the club. A feature dancer or two may be propped up for all to see and combing the crowd are other colorful entertainers. It adds a great mix of flavor to the club in the later hours and the crowd digs the extras like glow sticks and candy handed out by the hot-bodied dancers or men in drag. Yet another visual to keep your interest peaked is the footage of live concerts and music videos projected on the screens above the dance floor. You’re sure to draw inspiration from somewhere and I’m sure you’ll enjoy what Rumi is throwing down on the dance floor.

Rumi Nightclub, Buenos Aires

Getting there

Rumi is located on the Costanera of Buenos Aires, but not near Puerto Madero. Instead, look north. It’s much closer to Belgrano and the cab rides are cheap from other eating and nightlife areas such as Recoleta, Palermo or Las Canitas. Mention the club name to a cabbie or scribble down the address and you’ll be there in no time.

Location of Rumi Nightclub

Avenida Figueroa Alcorta 6442, near La Pampa, Costanera Norte

Tel: 4782-1307,  Website: http://www.rumiba.com.ar/

Club Boutique (ex Club Museum)

July 8, 2007 by · 5 Comments 

Buenos Aires After-Office

All the shiny disco balls you could ever need - Club Museum, Buenos Aires

(Note: Museum has now been renamed “Club Boutique”)

(But most people still refer to it as Club Museum, so it’ll stay that way for most of this article!)

[Article written by Alan Epstein]

In a late-night city like Buenos Aires it isn’t hard to find a club that stays open until the crack of dawn, or an “after hours” party that will keep you dancing until 10am the next day. This is what makes Club Museum / Boutique in San Telmo so special: on Wednesdays, the people come pouring into this massive three-story club early, at around 7pm, for their “After Office” party.

Wednesday has traditionally been the midweek choice for “After-Office” parties, when the businessmen of downtown Buenos Aires loosen their ties and down a few cocktails. You don’t have to have a suit, tie and briefcase to attend Museum’s Wednesday night affair, but do come dressed the part. Shorts and sandals are frowned upon at the door.

Party revellers having a good time at Club Museum

Club Museum – Two-for-one happy “hour”

Happy hour begins at 7pm, and then until 10pm selected drinks are 2-for-1, with the food reasonably priced as well. Unusual for Buenos Aires nightclubs, there is no charge for entry at Museum until happy hour is over.

A wide variety of dining options… and sushi!

The variety of food is decent – you can have picadas, pizzas, capresse salad, or of course sushi, as this is Buenos Aires’ trendiest option. The sushi here is about as good as it is anywhere else in Buenos Aires. It’s the same-old-same with sushi in Argentina, everything is salmon and cream cheese, salmon and cream cheese… or you might get their version of a tuna roll, where they actually stick tuna from a can inside the sushi rice. It’s actually not that bad, but it’s a shocker to see if you are a real sushi connoisseur.

For a more typically Argentine choice, there is the Tabla de Quesos y Fiambres, which is a platter of meats and cheeses, including jamon crudo (cured ham) – unbelievably tasty and large enough for two to pick on, and a good amount to eat to not get bogged down for dancing.

Eating and drinking at Club Museum's after office party

What do Club Museum and the Eiffel Tower have in common?

The building is quite striking, and it really stands out from the rest in this part of San Telmo. The sheer size of Club Museum is  nothing short of overwhelming, having been designed by Gustave Eiffel, of Eiffel Tower fame! This old style French influence is apparent outside and in.

There is a huge cluster of giant disco balls hanging from the ceiling and large projection screens playing a mixture of liquor and fashion commercials, and also street scenes from across Europe. The floor is wide open in the middle with tables in the front and in the back. There are also tables to sit on at the perimeters of the second and third floors, which you need reservations to get.

Club Museum's big projection screen

Live Bands – first sit down and enjoy the show…

Club Museum puts on live bands most Wednesdays from around 9pm to 10pm. During this time it is probably more comfortatble to sit either on the second or third floor balconies so you can enjoy your food and the music simultaneously without losing your voice attempting to talk to your friends over the speakers. To ensure that you have a decent seat you can reserve a table in advance (see below for details), though to do so you should have at least 6 or 7 people in your party.

…then get on the dance floor

Once 10pm rolls around make your way down to the dance floor where the DJ will surely play every song Madonna has ever recorded. It may be true that Madonna sings about 15% of the songs played in Buenos Aires nightclubs, and Museum is no different. The mix at Museum is mostly 80s music and electronic, with some latin favorites thrown in.

When you are downstairs, remember that the Argentines require less personal space in general than in the United States (and perhaps in Europe too). Everybody is bumping into each other and amazingly nobody gets upset about it. It’s just the way it is in Buenos Aires. Restrain from getting angry and pushing back – this is just a cultural difference to get used to.

Museum is definitely the place to be on a Wednesday. Start at 7pm, leave before 3am (closing time), and still get up for work the next morning!

Dancing through the evening in Buenos Aires

Club Museum: Reservations

For advance reservations, you can contact Club Museum using the following details:

Online contact: Click here to inquire about the club online
Phone: 4611-5657 or 4632-9381 (between 10am and 6pm, Mondays to Fridays)

Location of Club Museum

Peru 535, between Venezuela & Mexico, San Telmo

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