Anuva Wine Tasting in Buenos Aires

April 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

*PLEASE NOTE: Anuva Wines unexpectedly closed down permanently on January 12th 2017. We are currently looking into alternative wine tasting options in the city to be able to update the below article – feel free to contact us in the meantime to ask for a wine tasting recommendation in Buenos Aires*

A lovely wine tasting in Palermo, Buenos Aires

Anuva Wines offers wine tastings in Buenos Aires, for those who wish to sample some great boutique wines, but can’t necessarily make it to the wine producing regions of the country. Located in a luminous loft in the chic neighborhood of Palermo Soho, this wine club opened in 2007, and offers tastings with English speaking experts that are both educational and fun. All of their wines are boutique, which means you won’t find them in the grocery store, here or at home.

Anuva wines

I recently attended a Friday afternoon tasting (lucky me!). Upon arrival, a delightful English woman named Cara showed me to my seat, and our table quickly filled up with a lively set of international travelers. I made small talk with the other guests and the staff of Anuva, who graciously answered questions about Buenos Aires and offered suggestions for dining and activities.

And then came the moment we’d all been anxiously awaiting: the tasting!

Surprising white wines

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First came a sparkling wine from Hom Espumante. Poppy, who lead our wine tasting, gave us some general tasting advice and then explained the different processes by which wine makers convert whites into sparkling wines. This light and refreshing blend was deliciously drinkable. Once we’d sipped, everyone at the table agreed that Poppy’s explanations deepened our appreciation of the bubbly! Each wine was paired with an Argentine tapa specifically selected to accentuate certain flavors in each of the wines, and I found our blue cheese and pear hors d’oeuvre went perfectly with the espumante (sparkling in Spanish).

Next came a marvelous Las Perdices Torrontés. This white was floral on the nose but when paired with two yummy gelatos, the wine’s different fruit notes really stood out.  Poppy spoke about the Torrontés grape, one of Argentina’s most important and lovingly nicknamed “la uva mentirosa” (the liar grape; can you guess why?). She also explained the wine growing regions of Argentina and how the characteristics of each influence the taste, acidity, and alcohol content.  Tasting the Torrontés, I could tell that the terroir of Salta province has a direct effect on its flavor!

Red, red wine!

Our table discussed the wines we’d tasted so far and raved about Argentina’s ice creams as the Anuva staff filled our remaining glasses with three reds.  We were all eager to begin and grateful when Poppy presented the first wine: one of Argentina’s famous Malbecs from Carinae vineyards, which was paired with an Argentine picada of cheeses and salamis.

wine1

The spectacular hostesses answered questions about wine production in Argentina as we enjoyed the malbec; each of these women is highly knowledgeable of the industry, and I recommend asking any question that occurs to you about the vino (wine in Spanish).  Indeed, the tasting was professional but not at all pretentious, and unlike in other tastings I’ve been to that give you two drops of each varietal, Anuva gives generous servings and offers refills.

We moved on to what I found to be the stand-out wine of the afternoon: a San Gimignano Syrah! Wonderfully light and minerally, Poppy joked that this wine is a woman’s wine, because it’s so delicate on the palate.  Here we sampled a traditional meat empanada, yum!

By the time we arrived at the last wine, a robust and velvety Bonarda from Mairena, our table had become best of friends. Anuva’s team (and their wines) creates a welcoming, convivial atmosphere, and I learned from my fellow wine tasters! For example, the Australian at the table was impressed that Argentine wines weren’t as heady as the Aussies are used to, and Poppy explained how growing conditions affect alcohol content; the pair from San Francisco compared Argentina’s dry, high altitude conditions with the more wet Napa Valley and Sonoma county, and considered how that affects sulfide content.

And oh yeah, the Bonarda was to die for, a perfect way to end a delightful tasting!

Anuva wines tasting

Here I am with my tasting buddies, happily smiling for the group photo! Once the tasting was through, the staff offered refills and let us know that all the wines sampled (and more) are available for purchase. Best of all, they even deliver to the US with free shipping!

To reserve, click here to book a tasting with Anuva Wines

The price is US$52 per person. Exact location details are revealed by Anuva upon booking, but as mentioned, the wine tasting is held in a specialist tasting room in the Palermo Soho neighborhood. The tastings last for about 90 minutes to 2 hours, and are usually scheduled at 3pm or 6pm Mon-Thu, or 2pm or 5pm Fri-Sat (although other times may be available upon request).

 

Argentine Wine: Grocery Store Picks

March 25, 2013 by · 1 Comment 

The best part of living in Buenos Aires?

BsAs wine recommendations

Here at BuenosTours, we feel that outstanding wine is one of the biggest perks of living in Buenos Aires!  Vino (wine in Spanish) is a part of daily life in Argentina; often mixed with soda (sparkling water) or even Coke, it’s a staple at the Sunday family asado and the Friday night gathering alike.  The country produces a variety of choices at affordable prices, and a sizable selection is always available at the “Chino”, aka the local grocery store (“Chino” meaning Chinese store, since most are run by Asian immigrants. Yes, Argentines can be pretty politically incorrect at times).

For a more professional opinion and better quality, boutique wines, we recommend that you try a wine tasting with our friends at Anuva Wines. But to find out what we here at BuenosTours are drinking, read on…

BuenosTours local wine recommendations

After an arduous sampling period, The BuenosTours Staff presents our picks of Vino from the Chino (drumroll please!).  From Malbec to Torrontés, look for these bottles at your corner store and sip your way through Argentina’s lovely harvests!

Buenos Aires sparkling wine

Alan: Tour guide to the rich and famous, CEO of BuenosTours, and yet he still sometimes adds soda to his wine!

My chino wine faves are Santa Julia and Portillo, all in the mid-to-high twenties range.  As a fan of the Pinot Noir varietal, I appreciate Almas Moras’s sense of humor: they call it “Pinot Negro” (negro meaning black in Spanish) rather than sticking to the French name.  It’s not always easy to find Pinot Noir in Argentina, but the aforementioned by Finca Las Moras is affordable (about $28 pesos at my local chino), and in a slightly higher price range, Alamos offers a really nice version.

I do NOT recommend Romani’s Malbec – the worst bottle I’ve had in years!  Beautiful label, but don’t be fooled by that.  It was overly acidic and had a nasty aftertaste. Avoid.

Isabel of the Buenos Tours team!

Isabel: On-location neighborhood reporter, city cyclist and San Lorenzo die hard!

My favourites are:

  • Gascón malbec (about $35 – $40 a bottle). Really tasty, good with an asado.
  • Emilia (especially the Malbec/Bonarda mix, about $35 a bottle). Very light and nice to drink with snacks rather than a heavy meal.

I also like:

  • Elementos – it is often on offer and it’s tasty, good mid-week wine. I remember it was $12 in the Chino on the corner in Boedo where I used to live. Now it would be more like $25… I like the Cabernet.
  • Postales de Fin del Mundo – about $25 a bottle, maybe a bit more, well as we know the prices probably increased in the time it took to write this recommendation…  This bodega has won all kinds of international awards.
  • And if I am in a rush and strapped for cash, I would grab a Callia (Syrah/Malbec blend) or San Telmo is often on offer and a safe bet.

Calia wine recommendations


Buying wine in Buenos AiresQuincy: 
Espresso connoisseur and Argentine lingo lover.

Probably my favorite, the Alma Mora malbec is an assertive, mid-range wine that literally means Blackberry Soul.  It’s from San Juan – a region who often sends grapes to neighboring Mendoza to be blended into bigger wineries’ varietals.  But Las Moras proudly produces San Juanino wine, and since my boyfriend’s family is from there, Alma Mora fills me with nostalgia.White Wine Torrontes Argentina

Quara is an affordable fave.  A llama graces the label in homage to that peaceful creature essential to the Incas.  Torrontés, a white, grows exceptionally well in Cafayate, where Quara is from.  While Argentina is most famous for its Malbecs,  Torrontes is actually considered the only 100% Argentine wine.  Also try the Cafayate bodega’s Torrontes.

On a forgiving budget? Try San Felipe’s Tempranillo.  And when splurging for a special occasion, go for the fragrant San Felicien.

 

 

Buenos Tours team

Oliver: Boisterous tour guide, comedian and BA actor!

I pick a wine at the ‘Chino’ the same way I do anywhere else in the world. I decide on a price range, for example around us$5, and look for wines in that range that other people have bought, by looking for wines where you have to reach back onto the shelf. I figure that random strangers are better at picking wines than I am!

 

***Oliver, a true man of the people. Looks like the rest of the team will be in charge when picking the wine at our next meeting!***

 

 

 

Cheers wine buenos aires

Pat: Red-meat correspondent and all-American sports fan!

My picks are…..

  • Uxmal (Malbec):  Has kind of a smoky finish, goes well with meat. Also about 32 pesos at my Chino.
  • Latitud 33 (Malbec):  Nice, smooth red. Again, in the low-30 peso range. Good for a night cap.
  • Colón (Syrah or Malbec):  Solid, peoples-wine, and good for 20 pesos. Good for a drink before you go out.

 

 

Drinking wine in Argentina

Jessica: In-demand tour guide and soulful San Telmo crooner!

Callia is always my cheap red go-to bottle, Malbec or Syrah.

A little nicer, Finca Flichman makes pretty good Malbec and Cabernet at good prices, and they’re aged in oak (roble) which most cheap wines aren’t. Way better with food than on its own.

Also, a wildcard, I like white wine, and I have found NO GOOD WHITE WINE IN CHINOS for under 40 pesos (any suggestions?). Except for of course my summer favorite – sweet white! Late harvest! It may be girly, but don’t underestimate the Norton Cosecha Tardia Dulce Natural. Ice cold. On a terraza (terrace). At sunset. Mmmmmm…

As far as things to avoid… if I have a dinner party, please do not bring Michel Torino or Valderrobles. It’s offensive. On second thought, it’s more offensive to come empty handed, so I guess if you do bring them, you’ll just have to drink them alone because I’d rather have a coca light.

Ahh, so many vinos, so little time! Keep the aforementioned in mind when in need of some thirst slakers. And let us know: what wine do you pick up when you head to the Chino?

For more information on Argentine wines, WineSur is a great resource, and features wine reviews by international critics.  Or check out this article on the history of wine in Argentina at The Real Argentina.

Chino Viejo, our new favourite chino wine!

Buenos Aires Wine Tasting

May 31, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

*PLEASE NOTE: Anuva Wines unexpectedly closed down permanently on January 12th 2017. We are currently looking into alternative wine tasting options in the city to be able to update the below article – feel free to contact us in the meantime to ask for a wine tasting recommendation in Buenos Aires*

Daniel Karlin and his team will talk you through some of Argentina's best wines

Discover the best of Argentina’s Wines with a wine tasting in Buenos Aires…

Anuva Wines: The Company

Argentina’s wine regions attract wine lovers from the world over, who fall in love with the bountiful and unique wines produced here.  One such man is Daniel Karlin, owner and operator of Anuva Wines, a wine club that offers wine tastings for visitors to Buenos Aires.  Anuva – a Spanglish wordplay on the word uva (grape), is also a name in India and Russia, translated as ‘knowledge’ and ‘new beginning’ – a perfectly fitting name and mantra for this new(ish) business which boasts extensive expertise of Argentine wines.

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