Cafe Margot, Boedo

October 17, 2012 by · 2 Comments 

Soak in the atmosphere of San Juan y Boedo Antiguo

Esquina-Homero-Manzi-Boedo

[Photo credit: Gobierno de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires Flickr account/ /CC BY 2.0]

The corner of San Juan and Boedo, made famous by the tango singer Homero Manzi in the opening lines of his song Sur (‘San Juan y Boedo antiguo, y todo el cielo‘ – ‘Old San Juan and Boedo, and all the sky’) is the site of a café (now a tango show by night) that was a gathering place for local left-leaning writers and intellectuals in the 1920s. Close to the corner are a number of cafes and restaurants well worth the 20 minute trip from downtown or 30 minutes from Palermo, including Pan y Arte, Cossab and Cafe Margot.

Boedo: Barrio on the rise

You might hear Boedo touted as Buenos Aires’ most up-and-coming neighbourhood, with its burgeoning arts scene, old school milongas (Tango dance halls) and claims to be the bona fide birthplace of the Tango. Although the idea that this traditional barrio is on the road to Palermo Soho style development might strike fear into the hearts of those who love it, for now at least it has retained an authentic, residential feel.

cafe-margot-boedo

[Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jglsongs/2227925169/ /CC BY 2.0]

Mingle with the locals at Café Margot

Café Margot was first opened in 1904 and recently completed renovation work has restored the café’s exterior to its former glory. Inside, Café Margot is enchanting, with whole hams hanging from the ceiling, exhibitions by local artists on the walls and waiters in waistcoats swerving around closely packed wooden tables, balancing trays of coffees and medialunas (croissants) or bottles of beer and baskets of monkey nuts.

But forget the inside. On a warm summer’s evening in the city there are few better places to be than sitting at a pavement table outside Margot drinking a cold beer and eating picadas (a shared plate of food to pick on such as olives, salami, ham and olives). Also recommended are the sandwiches de pavita (turkey, the house special) and, when they have them, the empanadas de parrilla (empanadas filled with slices of steak).

For more reviews of Cafe Margot, check out this blog post by Foodie in BsAs and Dan at Saltshaker’s turkey-tastic review.

Location of  Café Margot in Boedo, Buenos Aires

Café Margot, Avenida Boedo 857 (corner with San Ignacio), Boedo

Telephone: 4957-0001

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La Panaderia de Pablo

August 28, 2012 by · 1 Comment 

Feast all day long on pizza and cake at chef Pablo Massey’s joint

Pablo Massey showing off his bread at La Panaderia

The thin crust oven baked pizzas at TV chef Pablo Massey’s Montserrat eatery, La Panaderia de Pablo (Defensa 269), seem like the chic Italian cousins who’ve come over from Naples to visit their doughy, greasy Argentinean relatives from Avenida Corrientes. But according to the chef proprietor, who spent three years in Florence honing his pizza-making skills, try presenting a Porteño with an authentic Italian pizza – tomato sauce, basil and buffalo mozzarella topping – and you’ll be met with the response ‘Eso no se hace’ (that’s not how it’s done). Instead the crispy slices we were munching on were an Argentina-fied version, made with salty cow’s mozzarella with fresh basil leaves on top.

All-day menu of pizzas, sandwiches and more

Although panaderia means bakery, La Panaderia de Pablo is, confusingly, not a panaderia at all, although they do bake five varieties of their own bread on the premises each morning, which you can also buy to take-away. Open from 8am to 7pm Monday to Thursday and 8am to late on Friday, it’s a hybrid breakfast / lunch / afternoon tea place serving a simple all-day menu of pizzas, sandwiches, salad and steak along with a mouth-watering selection of pastries and deserts, washed down with Illy coffee, Tealosophy tea blends or wine. Recover from your hangover with Sunday’s special brunch menu from 10am to 7pm (closed on Saturdays).

Sunny welcome at Pablo Massey's restaurant La Panaderia de Pablo

Chic, modern restaurant

Stepping off the history-steeped San Telmo streets into a modern, light-filled space with industrial concrete surfaces, chunky wooden furniture, exposed brick walls and heavy Portuguese cutlery, it feels more like New York’s meatpacking district, or at least Palermo Hollywood. Walk past huge shelves stacked with bread, olive oil and balsamic vinegar, olives and pastries to buy and into the main dining room and watch the chefs preparing the pizzas in the open plan kitchen as you wait for your food. But for all its interior-designed style and the celebrity name above the door, prices are reasonable and lunch here need not feel like a massive splurge.

Tasty Italian style pizza at La Panaderia de Pablo in Buenos Aires

Indulge yourself

After a Fugazzetta (onion, mozzarella and olive oil pizza) or Fugazza (the same without cheese), tuck into the dulce de leche filled, meringue topped Torta Rogel (the best we’ve tasted) and though you’ll feel like you never want to eat again you won’t be able to resist stocking up on alfajores on the way out.

For other reviews of La Panaderia de Pablo check out the AhhArgentina’s blog post and the review of Sunday Brunch on La Panza Porteña blog.

La Panaderia de Pablo, Defensa 269, City Center (Montserrat)

Telephone: 4331 6728       Website: http://www.lapanaderiadepablo.com/

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